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success_story_julyTransforming Struggles into Triumphs for a Personal Best Half Marathon Time

What has been your major running milestone?
I ran my second half marathon this year last weekend and ended up taking 18 and half mins off my last half marathon time!

What is the secret to your success?
Prioritising running in my very busy life and making sure that I followed my Runcoach plan as much as possible helped me to not only run without stopping but also knock this time off!

What has been the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how did you move forward?
My IT band started niggling and causing me knee pain three weeks out from the race. I’d been injured before my last half marathon so I knew early treatment and then a belief in myself on the day was key. Having this attitude really helped me and I was beyond thrilled with my time.

What is the most rewarding part of training?
Feeling myself getting stronger and spending time with my running group who are like family to me now.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community?
Dream big and don’t be afraid to push yourself out of your comfort zone. Run outdoors as much as you can and run with others. There’s nothing like keeping yourself accountable especially on those cold and wet days, laughing and chatting with your friends and achieving your goals whether they’re big or small. Above all enjoy yourself and celebrate everything that you achieve!

Is there anything else you would like to share?
I’ve loved training with the Runcoach. It’s exceeded my expectations and I can’t wait to see how much further I can push myself. Thank you Rosie and team!


hydrateSummer is one of the best seasons to be a runner.  Enjoy it to the fullest by taking care of these basics.

Winter weather often requires the use of treadmills and other indoor facilities, but summer’s heat or thunderstorms may also force you to the air-conditioned sanctuary of the gym.  Here are a few helpful things to remember about how to adjust when running indoors.

Highlights:
  • - Treadmills are not the enemy
  • - Bring entertainment (music, movie, book, podcast)
  • - Bring your own sanitizer (always clean any touchpoint, equipment before use)
  • - The treadmill belt is softer and offers less impact than running on pavement
  • - Set the incline to 1-2% on the machine 
  • - Ease into the run. Start nice and slow. 
  • - Hydrate well and often. Aim to take 3-4 ounces of water every 25-30 minutes.

If running indoors may not be an option, but running outdoors is not either, you may be in a spot where cross training is in order to maintain fitness.  What cross training activity makes the most sense?  Compare and contrast the vast array of currently available options available in gyms today.

Heading out on some adventurous runs or driving trips that might include a bunch of miles?  Consider this list of things you might not consider, but can be VERY helpful for runners who are spending a lot of time in the car.

All that humidity might leave you a bit sweaty.  Before you deal with the after effects of some serious chafing, read our quick Q&A with a dermatologist about chafing and how to avoid it.  

While one of the most obvious topics for summer running, hydration is always worth keeping in mind, particularly if your average fluid consumption consists primarily of coffee or diet coke! Use the summer to build some good habits and read about the “art of hydration” here.

Updated by Cally on July 15, 2023

 

 

 



Glute Activation is Key

Written by Rosie Edwards June 26, 2023

As a runner, chances are at some point or another you’ve experienced pain in your hamstrings, knees, or lower back that just won’t seem to let up no matter how much you stretch.
Interestingly enough, this pain may actually be stemming from inactive glute muscles (also known as the ol’ butt).

Luckily, performing a few simple activation exercises pre-run can stop this pain in its tracks, allowing you to run powerful, strong, and injury free.

“So why aren’t my glutes firing?” you may ask.
The most commong reason is that most people sit for long periods of time. The glute muscles tend to stop firing due to a lack of oxygen and tightened hip flexors. This, in return, puts more strain on the lower back, hamstrings, and knees, that imbalanced and stiff feeling when you head out for a run.

Add these simple exercises to your warm up routine and get those glutes firing.
Turn up the intensity of these exercises by adding a resistance band. Aim for 2 sets of 10 reps on each leg.

>> Glute activation video via Single Leg Squat <<

Exercises:

1. Clam shells
 clamshell Lay on your side, with your knees bent at 90 degrees. Keep your feet and ankles together and raise your top knee. Make sure not to raise the knee too high-you should feel a slight tug in the glute area





2. Single Leg Bridgebridge

Keep your one knee bent, and straighten the other legs. Slowly move your leg up and down. Make sure you aren’t feeling this in your hamstring, you want the glutes to be doing all the work.







3. Prone Leg Liftsprone

Lying flat on your stomach, focus on raising first one leg at a time. If the knee bends you are using too much hamstring.










4. Fire Hydrantsfirehydrant
Place your hands underneath your shoulders and your knees underneath your hips. Flex your feet and keep both your feet flexed even as you raise one leg.

Then raise one leg out to the side, keeping the knee bent to 90 degrees. Lift it as high as you can while keeping your arms straight. Try to not let the foot get higher than the knee or the knee get higher than the foot. Really squeeze the butt cheek as you lift.

Hold for a second or two at the top. Lower down and then repeat. Complete all reps on one side before switching.



As a runner, you understand the importance of staying injury-free to maintain training consistency and reach your goals. Running-related injuries can be frustrating setbacks, but with the right knowledge and preventive measures, you can minimize the risk. Stay tuned as we explore effective injury prevention tips, helping you stay strong, healthy, and on the road to success:

Gradual Progression:

  • One of the key factors in preventing injuries is a gradual progression in your training. Avoid sudden increases in mileage or intensity, as this can overload your body and lead to injuries. Gradually increase your mileage, duration, and intensity to allow your muscles, tendons, and bones to adapt and strengthen over time.

Proper Warm-up and Cool-down:

  • A proper warm-up and cool-down routine are crucial for injury prevention. Prior to your run, engage in dynamic stretching and light exercises to warm up your muscles and increase blood flow. After your run, perform static stretches to cool down and improve flexibility. These routines help prepare your body for the demands of running and aid in recovery.

Strength Training:

  • Incorporating strength training into your routine can significantly reduce the risk of running-related injuries. Focus on exercises that target your core, hips, and glutes, as these muscle groups play a vital role in maintaining proper running form and absorbing impact. Include exercises such as squats, lunges, planks, and clamshells to build strength and stability.

Listen to Your Body:

  • One of the most important aspects of injury prevention is listening to your body. Pay attention to any warning signs of pain, discomfort, or fatigue. If you experience persistent pain or discomfort, it's essential to rest and seek professional advice. Ignoring these signals can lead to more severe injuries and prolonged recovery periods.

Proper Footwear:

  • Investing in a good pair of running shoes that suit your foot type is crucial. Ill-fitting or worn-out shoes can contribute to various injuries. We recommend changing shoes every 300-400 miles inclusive any walking or other activities you wear them for in addition to running.

Cross-Training:

  • Incorporating cross-training activities such as swimming, cycling, or strength training on non-running days can help prevent overuse injuries and promote overall fitness. It gives your body a break from the repetitive impact of running while strengthening different muscle groups.

Injury prevention should be a priority for every runner, regardless of experience level. By following these injury prevention tips, you can minimize the risk of common running injuries and enjoy a consistent and fulfilling running journey. Stay proactive in your injury prevention efforts, and keep pounding the pavement with confidence!

 



From Motherhood to a Marathon PR of 2:55:10: Embracing Goals, Consistency, and Camaraderie

What has been your major running milestone? Success_Story

I feel very fortunate to have recently achieved my marathon PR of 2:55:10 at 44. :)  I largely took my 20s and 30s off of training while focused on my three daughters and my career, and it has been really fun to get back into setting goals and training more seriously since turning 40.

How did you get into the sport?
I started running in middle school - it was the most accessible sport for a daughter of an immigrant who otherwise saw the better focus of time on academics. As it got more structured in high school, I loved the trials of practice and competition, as well as the team aspects of the sport.

What is the secret to your success?
Waking up early! I'm usually done with my workouts by 7:15am during the week, whether it's 4 miles or 12. If I'm not done by then, it's likely something else will take priority later in the day and I'd be at risk of not completing it. I also hate having to think about nutrition relative to a late-in-day workout, so it's great to be done early.

What has been the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how did you move forward?
Consistency in doing workouts of effort!  It was easy enough to get out to run 3-5 miles on any given day.  But doing workouts to develop each system is the key to achieving time/race goals!  This is where Runcoach was a huge game changer for me - being able to work with a coach to set a goal and then not have to come up with a plan with WHAT to do, but rather just do it, was critical.

What is the most rewarding part of training?
Camaraderie and seeing it pay off!  For 2023, I made a resolution to do more of my easy days with others, in addition to partners I have for workouts.  It makes a world of difference and running so enjoyable to vary the quieter, music/podcast days with conversation.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community?
Set a goal, make a date, and stick with it! My friends that don't "get" running usually fall back on "it's so boring". We know that's not true, but even for runners, not having a goal can make training feel a bit aimless.  Set a goal (or goals) for whatever training cycle you like, find friends and other ways to keep yourself accountable - including your coach! - and make sure you get out the door. For a lot of us more distance-oriented folks - especially over 40 - the first couple of miles might not feel great, but KEEP GOING.  Remember that post-workout feeling!

What advice would you give to your younger self?
Meet yourself where you are, and compare yourself to your realistic expectations for that year relative to everything else you're trying to achieve in your life.  And stretch.

Is there anything else you would like to share?
Take the time to understand what nutrition habits work best for you. I've learned a ton in the last two years about what my body needs to feel better, and do better, and calories before and during workouts and good fuel immediately post has made a huge difference.


Summer_Training_PMAs the temperatures rise, summer offers a unique opportunity for runners to embrace the heat and use it as a training advantage for their upcoming fall races. While it may be tempting to retreat to the air-conditioned comfort of a gym, or scale back training during the sweltering months, running in the summer can bring numerous benefits that can significantly enhance your performance in the fall. We will explore the advantages of running in the summer and how it can help you achieve your racing goals in the months to come:

1. Improved Endurance:

Running in the heat challenges your body in ways that can translate into increased endurance and stamina. As your body works harder to regulate its temperature and adapt to environmental conditions, your cardiovascular system becomes more efficient. This improved efficiency can lead to enhanced oxygen utilization, better circulation, and a higher tolerance for physical exertion. By training in the summer, you can push your limits and build a solid foundation for long-distance races in the fall.

2. Mental Toughness:

Enduring hot and humid conditions during summer runs can develop mental toughness and resilience, which are crucial for race day success. Running in uncomfortable conditions teaches you to embrace discomfort, overcome challenges, and stay focused on your goals. The mental strength developed during summer training will carry over to your fall races, helping you push through fatigue, maintain a positive mindset, and tackle any obstacles that come your way.

3. Enhanced Heat Tolerance:

Regular summer running exposes your body to higher temperatures, leading to improved heat tolerance. As you sweat more during runs, your body becomes more efficient at cooling itself, allowing you to handle heat and stress better. This adaptation can be especially beneficial during fall races, where the weather conditions may still be warm. Your body will be better equipped to regulate its temperature, reducing the risk of overheating and enabling you to maintain a strong pace throughout your races.

4. Vitamin D Boost:

Running in the summer sun exposes you to natural sunlight, which stimulates vitamin D production in your body. Vitamin D is essential for bone health, immune function, and mood regulation. Spending time outdoors while running can increase your vitamin D levels, boost your mood, and enhance your overall well-being. The combination of exercise, sunlight, and fresh air can have a powerful positive impact on your mental and emotional state.

5. Race-Day Simulation:

If your fall race is scheduled in a warm climate, summer running provides an opportunity to simulate race conditions and acclimate to the heat. By training in similar environmental conditions, your body gradually adapts and becomes more efficient at managing stress. This acclimation can give you a significant advantage on race day, as your body will be better prepared to perform optimally in challenging conditions.

Embrace the summer heat as an opportunity rather than a hindrance to your training. Stay determined, and remember that the rewards of your hard work will be waiting for you at the finish line! Happy Global Running Day!


 With our system, you can design a training plan that's customized to fit your current level of activity and fitness. Get started with just 5 easy steps.

1. Identify yourself.  
Go to the Settings, and identify what kind of athlete you are.

2. Plug in your goal. On the Goals and Results Page, select “+NEW GOAL."

3. Tell us about a racing history. Click  “+NEW RACE” and plug in a recent race time.

4. Design your workout schedule. On the Schedule & History page,  tell us about how much exercise you’re currently doing, and tell us when you’d like to workout and rest.

5. Sync your activity tracker. Movecoach syncs with many popular activity trackers. When you sync your service, and your miles will automatically be uploaded to your Movecoach or Runcoach log. Movecoach and Runcoach sync with Garmin, Strava, Apple Health, RunKeeper, GoogleFit, FitBit.. To learn more, click here.

6. Ask for help. Our experts and coaches are here to answer your questions about training, nutrition, and technical issues.  Reach out to us by tapping Support on your Mobile App or writing to us at coach@movecoach.com

Modified by Cally Macumber, 5/29/2023




crosstrainingIf you’re a seasoned runner, you're likely familiar with the energizing feeling of hitting the pavement or exploring nature's trails. But, did you know that incorporating cross-training into your routine can take your running to the next level? Cross-training offers an abundance of benefits, including improved performance and reduced injury risk. In this blog post, we'll dive into the world of cross-training for runners, exploring the ideal activities to complement your training and providing practical tips for integrating cross-training into your training plan.

But first, what is cross-training?

Cross-training involves participating in alternative exercises and activities that supplement your primary sport, in this case, running. While running is an exceptional cardiovascular and lower-body strengthening activity, it can also lead to overuse injuries and muscular imbalances. Cross-training addresses these concerns by targeting different muscle groups, enhancing overall fitness, and mitigating burnout.

What are optimal cross-training activities for runners?

When it comes to cross-training, not all activities are created equal. The ideal cross-training exercises for runners should complement running, enhance cardiovascular fitness, improve muscular strength and endurance, and minimize joint impact. Here are some highly effective options to consider:

Cycling: A low-impact activity that develops lower-body strength, boosts cardiovascular fitness, and enhances endurance. By pedaling through varying terrains, you'll strengthen your leg muscles while minimizing stress on your joints.

Swimming: Training that offers the experience of a full-body workout. It enhances cardiovascular fitness, builds upper-body strength, and promotes muscular endurance. The water reduces impact, making swimming an excellent choice for recovery and injury prevention.

Strength Training: Engaging in strength training exercises, such as weightlifting, bodyweight exercises, or resistance training, is instrumental in fortifying muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Focus on exercises that target core stability, hip strength, glute activation, and leg muscles to improve running form and prevent injuries.

Yoga and Pilates: These mind-body practices contribute to overall fitness by improving flexibility, balance, body awareness, and stability. Incorporating yoga or Pilates sessions into your routine can enhance recovery, reduce muscle imbalances, and provide mental benefits like stress reduction and improved focus.

How can you integrate cross-training into your training plan?

It is essential to integrate cross-training into your training plan strategically. Follow these practical tips for seamless integration:

Define your objectives, whether it's improving speed, endurance, or injury prevention.

Strike a balance between running and cross-training sessions by considering your current fitness level, training volume, and recovery needs. Aim for two to three cross-training sessions per week alongside your running workouts.

Embrace a diverse range of cross-training activities to target different muscle groups, prevent overuse injuries, and prevent boredom - and rotate activities.

Listen to your body! If an activity causes discomfort or hinders your running performance, modify or replace it with a more suitable alternative.

What are the benefits of cross-training?

Integrating cross-training into your running routine offers a plethora of benefits:

Enhanced Overall Fitness: Cross-training improves cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, flexibility, and balance, creating a well-rounded athletic foundation.

Injury Prevention: By addressing muscular imbalances and reducing repetitive strain on specific muscle groups, cross-training lowers the risk of overuse injuries that are common among runners.

Accelerated Recovery: Engaging in low-impact activities like swimming or yoga on rest days promotes active recovery, aids in muscle repair, and facilitates optimal performance during running workouts.

Mental Refreshment: Cross-training injects variety and excitement into your training regimen, preventing monotony and keeping your mental motivation high.

You'll enhance your overall fitness and correct imbalances by embracing cross-training activities that complement running. So, lace up your running shoes, dive into the pool, or grab a set of weights - let the power of cross-training unlock your running potential.



From Winter Obstacles to Marathon Triumphs: Discover the Secrets to Consistent Success in Running at 58
Success_Story_May
Upcoming major milestones:
Heldeburg To Hudson Half in April - Marine Corps Marathon in October.

What is the secret to your success? Consistency is the key. Don't let excuses limit your results!

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Being in upstate NY, winter weather is the biggest obstacle. Some days, outdoor running is just not possible. As much as we do not like treadmills, it is a must to have here. That's my solution.

What is the most rewarding part of training? At 58 years old, and after having smoked for 25 years when I was younger, the most rewarding part is accomplishing things I never thought I would ever be able to do. Some of my rewards are health based.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Stay consistent. Don't let excuses get in the way of your success. Tell people why and how you were able to do it instead of listing all the excuses why you couldn't.

Anything else you would like to share? It is more beneficial to set lofty goals and fail than to set low goals and succeed.

What feedback would you offer on the Runcoach experience? Utilize the tools you have in your toolbox. They work. Also rely on the years of experience the coaches have.




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